Chocolate

chocolate

Today is Easter Sunday in the UK and a gorging of chocolate is what will occur across most of the country. Most of that chocolate will come from giant food corporations, where the stakeholders will reap the lion’s share of the reward, sadly not the workers.

In 1879, two Quakers George and Richard Cadbury founded a new model greenfield village near Birmingham, called Bournville, that they built for the expansion of their chocolate business.

The two businessmen (that’s entrepreneurs for any of you hustlers reading this) wanted to build something for their workers that was a real contrast to the squalid conditions of much of urban Britain during the 1800’s.

The welfare and health of their workforce were of high importance to them.

Today, the business they founded, loved and that they grew into one of the most famous chocolate brands, known around the world, is now part Mondelez, a giant global food corporation, where their corporate ‘values’ will be etched onto the walls of some faceless global HQ building.

There are a number of other examples of philanthropic business people who cared about the wellbeing of their workers in 18 & 1900’s.

Now the industrialised machine has become so fixated with profit and productivity enhancements, that they only concern themselves with wringing the most out the assets, including mainly their human assets (aka as people), that there is little consideration for a modern day Bournville.

Great business people care about their most important asset – you, their worker. She is what makes businesses great, ask George and Richard Cadbury.

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